Google Chromebook Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Mac OS X Lion for $30.....that beats the price of paying for a ChromeBook. But I wonder what the difference is. Their must be some things Chrome can do that X Lion cannot and vise-versa. Only thing I believe apple doesn't have is the "cloud" feature.


The final developer release of Mac OS X Lion came out last week with even more new hidden gems.

Of note, the ability to restart your computer directly into a Safari-only mode. It's essentially the same concept as Google's Chromebooks, which run entirely on the Chrome browser.

Does that make Lion a direct competitor with Chromebooks? Not exactly. But for a simple $30 upgrade, your existing computer can become a snappy, web-only machine just a Chromebook.
How Apple Can Destroy Chromebooks With Mac OS X Lion
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Mac OS X Lion for $30.....that beats the price of paying for a ChromeBook. But I wonder what the difference is. Their must be some things Chrome can do that X Lion cannot and vise-versa. Only thing I believe apple doesn't have is the "cloud" feature.
apple has iCloud just like googles cloud. iCloud is mentioned to be the best cloud service
i posted a article on apple's iCloud below

x lion and chrome can be installed on anything or will be able too, this might come down to who can provide the better cloud service.


Apple's iCloud reps best vision yet for consumers

Apple's much-anticipated announcement of cloud services for its OS X and iOS device portfolio was as sleek and integrated as most everything the Cupertino, Calif., company does.
While there has been extensive coverage of last week's announcement, I think the most important aspect of the announcement hasn't been given its due.

Apple now owns the beginnings of what will likely be the world's leading integrated consumer cloud portfolio.

Let's be clear. I'm not claiming Apple is the only consumer cloud service or that it will have the dominant share of cloud services overall. But Apple has the first end-to-end cloud experience from a consumer perspective. And--as is core to Apple's strategy--by owning every level of the user experience, the company can only make it tougher on the rest of the consumer computing market for the next several years.

"We're going to demote the PC and the Mac to just be a device," CEO Steve Jobs said. With those words, Jobs highlighted the reason iCloud will work. Computers are still difficult for many consumers, though the experience on both the PC and Mac side have gotten much better in the last 10 years. However, the rapid adoption of the smartphone--especially the iPhone--by consumers showed all of us that nothing needs to be difficult.

What seems to have occurred to Apple is that one of the primary reasons desktops and laptops have remained difficult to maintain is that they are the center of the computing universe for the consumer. Everything has had to be stored and executed there. So any required software must be installed by the consumer, and any required data must be acquired or generated by the consumer.

As we all know by now, the cloud combined with the mobile application model is a powerful disruptor. Want an app on your phone? Click "Buy It." Want access to data on multiple devices? Use online services to create, store, and analyze that data.

What Apple did was integrate the most common content-related functions directly into the phone, with no need to find, evaluate, or maintain the cloud services behind them beyond the initial configuration. It's just easy--remote control easy.

Now imagine Apple expandx that work to include video processing (with iCloud behind it), Garage Band track sharing (through iCloud), even a social network built around the consumer content stored in iCloud. All of it integrated in very intelligent ways, and all of it--or at least a "starter" version of all of it--included in the price of the phone.

Believe me, I'm not a fan of the "Steve Jobs will decide when and how you get your content--and for how much" scenario. (I've stopped buying from Apple for that reason.) CNET editor Dong Ngo put this discomfort in terms that I think will resonate with many digital media consumers:

The second side effect is the loss of control. As iCloud is integrated into apps and devices, that might mean users will not have control over it, and may even not be able to opt out. If you store your purchased digital content in Apple's iCloud storage space, that could mean the company has control over what you can view. It's unclear if you can even upload your own content, ripped music from your CDs or music purchased from other services for example, and store it in Apple's iCloud. Judging from the way iTunes syncs contents with devices, it's a safe guess that the iCloud service will offer users much less control over it than other existing cloud services.

However, I absolutely admire the user experience that Apple continues to drive. As Pip Coburn, author of "The Change Function," might say, it both solves a "crisis" (content sharing between devices) and has an extremely low total cost of adoption--a magic formula that will probably put aside concerns about control for many, many people.

To be sure, I think iCloud should be a wake-up call to the two companies that should have delivered these services by now, Microsoft and Google. It also validates a market in which Amazon.com has quietly been building up an impressive portfolio.

iCloud also gives us another reason to wonder whether any company can out-innovate Apple in the consumer computing arena...or the consumer cloud.

Read more: Apple's iCloud reps best vision yet for consumers | The Wisdom of Clouds - CNET News
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Mac OS X Lion for $30.....that beats the price of paying for a ChromeBook.
Well, sure, Lion for $30 - after paying $1000 for Apple's cheapest laptop.

On the other hand, I'm not sure what the big deal about "instant on" is. Unless you're shutting your machine down completely every single time you're done using it, it'll never be a problem. MacOS and Windows laptops wake from sleep maybe a second or two after opening the lid.

Also, nobody who needs a machine powerful enough that they'd shell out $1200 for a MacBook Pro is going to consider a Chromebook (at least not as their primary machine) anyway. Chromebooks were never meant to compete with that class of machine, or to do what they do (at least not for consumers - education may be a different story). Long story short, if there's any Apple machine that Chromebooks have to worry about, it's the iPad, not the Macintosh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Google sells services. Apple sells devices that more or less imposes the user to use Apple services. It seems that Google does not want to speak about devices : Kiolling the personal Computer, turning into a world where you can communicate freely to the sky anhd get answer .... with any device.
Apple on the other side really wants to keep on growing on the manufacturer market. With the chromebook, google just opens a wide wide wide concurrency to Apple because every manufacturer will have an efficient OS to build computers for.

A warmly recommend you to read this post (chromebook and iCloud lead Google and Apple to cloud war), and the related ones. The differences between the 2 clouds are explained and the consequences and stakes are developed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Pretty Ironical : Just after posting the previous post, I google MAC OS X lion (that I had never heard about, thank you guys :). A quick reading of the front page of the official website and then when I clicked to watch the video, I was asked to dowload Qicktime (I run linux).
It is as if Apple was falliing in the same trap as Microsoft a decade ago : Tryoing so hard to steal the market by ignoring standards ... and finaly getting isolated from the real world. I mean, Apple is still up, but this, I hate it, plus the fact that you need a credit card to get an account on the App store, even if you only intend to get free apps plus ... plus ... plus ... Well you get my point?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
It all boils down to customer preference and which one you like more, both OS will dominate, only due to their are a million people who believe mac computers are amazing and nothing can beat them, while google chrome books just seem cheap to them and "cannot" function like a full fledged OS. Really it'll come down to what you want and need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
This is apples to googles:

I like Macs... have used nothing but for the last 15 years. The problem with Macs is that they are expensive and, even with the iCloud service, remarkably proprietary. iCloud will be great, as long as you have a Mac or iDevice. There's no browser-based access (and why would there be? Apple wants you to buy a Mac, as well they should because that's their business).

What I like about Google services is they are good on every device. If it has a browser, you're good. I have an old iBook powerpc running Ubuntu 10.04 and google docs works great. Apples devices and strategies work well towards the company's strength: great hardware. Google's chromebook makes a ton of sense for its business online software and advertising.

Ig you like $1,000+ hardware, Apple is awesome. They do a great job. If you like an open web strategy with lower-cost computing, chromebooks are for you. I don't see a competition at all here. Microsoft and Google, though... There's your competition.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top