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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since everything is on "the cloud," how can I be sure that my stuff is MINE and not available to everyone? Isn't having everything kept online a little bit dangerous?
 

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Apparently, Google will keep it secure for you in their server and I heard that they have backups prepared just in case something unavoidable happens. I don't have problem with them keeping my files except some that contain unpublished copyright.
 

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It's always a good idea to have copies of everything off the cloud as well, just in case something happens. Like how you'd back up your computer in case it crashed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So is Google pretty confident that their servers are inaccessible to unauthorized users, or are they running firewalls that help prevent hacking? Especially if businesses are using their method of storage, this is a critical issue.
 

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I'm no expert but it looks like Google defaults to using SSL for all session encryption. And while the files you store on Google may not be encrypted individually, they will be spread across tens or hundreds of servers; so the likelihood of someone hacking Google's servers and than locating and reassembling one of your files from the fragments is pretty remote.

But you will still be vulnerable to phishing attacks. The weakest link in the chain is always the user.
 

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I think Google is confident enough to have the cloud service and with the necessary security measure in place. I would still back up everything I had in the 'cloud.'
 

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Google is already hosting mail and files for many businesses. If they mess up they wouldn't be in business very long. However I personally keep separate backup copies of everything in a safe place. No one is perfect, even google.

As for unauthorized access, the writers above make a good point. Google has your files spread all over and it would be very hard for a hacker to reassemble them. Google is on the business of securely maintaining your files. But consider that alternative -- are your files on your personal laptop secure? What's better? -- a professionally maintained file-system in the cloud, or a personal computer that may or may not be up-to-date with security software?
 

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Could not agree more

I'm no expert but it looks like Google defaults to using SSL for all session encryption. And while the files you store on Google may not be encrypted individually, they will be spread across tens or hundreds of servers; so the likelihood of someone hacking Google's servers and than locating and reasembling one of your files from the fragments is pretty remote.

But you will still be vulnerable to phishing attacks. The weakest link in the chain is always the user.
I could not agree more. And even if someone hacked Google's server and were able to reassemble one of your files, that's one file. I have seen so many people screwed over because they believed phishing emails and scam emails or links
 

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I really like the fact that they back things up. If I forget to back something up, chances are that I am not going to lose it. I think that loss of data has impacted me more than security issues.
 

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It comes down to how you personally balance these risk profiles.

1. Local. Physically close to me most of the time, running on hardware I own, maintain, and keep secure. I am responsible for backups, detecting and dealing with corruption or attack. I can control all access to the data, and can easily prevent remote access by switching it off when not in use. Vulnerable if I get burgled, mugged, flooded, etc.

2. Cloud. In the hands of specialists outside my control. Their greater expertise and specialisation can mean technical security measures are higher, physical security MUCH higher. Resilient, fault tolerant storage. Vulnerable to the motivations of same specialists. Always online.

It is a balancing act between doing something yourself and paying someone else. The line is in different places for different people, based on their own expertise and how easily they extend trust.
 

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Thanks

I'm no expert but it looks like Google defaults to using SSL for all session encryption. And while the files you store on Google may not be encrypted individually, they will be spread across tens or hundreds of servers; so the likelihood of someone hacking Google's servers and than locating and reassembling one of your files from the fragments is pretty remote.

But you will still be vulnerable to phishing attacks. The weakest link in the chain is always the user.
I had heard that the Chromebook and the cloud were pretty safe but I never really understood how it worked. That makes a great deal of sense though.
 
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